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Old EnglishsbEnglish
El sfxDenoting diminution
El sfxWord-ending found in hovel, brothel, kernel, often becomes 'le' in modern English.
Elbow nA joint between the forearm and upper arm and the corresponding joint in the forelimb of a quadruped; elbow, articulatio cubiti. 2. the joint of a mammal or bird that corresponds to the human elbow. 3. a length of pipe with a sharp bend in it. 4. the part of a sleeve that covers the elbow joint. 5. any turn or bend like that of the elbow, in a wall, building, and the like; a sudden turn in a line of coast or course of a river, road; also, an angular or jointed part of any structure, as the raised arm of a chair or sofa, or a short pipe fitting, turning at an angle or bent.
Elbow vbTo push one's way with the elbows. 2. to shove one's elbow into another person's ribs. 3. to push or hit with the elbow, as when one pushes by another. 4. to push rudely along; to elbow one's way. 5. to jut into an angle; to project or to bend after the manner of an elbow.
Elbow phr"At One's Elbow" - close by, near, close in attendance.
Elbow phr"Bend One's Elbow" - to drink excessively, immoderately, hard; to lift the elbow.
Elbow phr"Be Out at One's Elbows" - to be ragged, in poor condition. 2. out at elbow, with coat worn through at the elbows; shabby; in needy circumstances.
Elbow phr"Elbow One's Way" - to force one's way by pushing with the elbows; as, to elbow one's way through a crowd. 2. force somebody out of a job in order to occupy the position yourself.
Elbow phr"From One's Elbow" - away from one's side.
Elbow phr"Shake the Elbow" - to play dice.
Elbow phr"Suck at the Elbow" - to be a parasite, sponger.
Elbow phr"Up to One's Elbows In" - lit. with one's hands plunged in. 2. fig. to be deeply involved in one's work, tasks, activity, to be excessively busy.
Elbow-board nAboard at the bottom of a window on the inside.
Elbow-bone nThe Ulna, the main forearm bone. 2. olecranon, at the elbow of the ulna.
Elbowed adjHaving elbows; provided with elbow rests. 2. formed in the shape of an elbow, bent, curved
Elbowedness nThe state or quality of having a particular elbow.
Elbower nOne who elbows.
Elbowful adjAs much as one can hold in the crook of the elbow.
Elbowing nThe act of thrusting with the elbow. 2. a thrust with the elbow. 3.
Elbowless adjWithout elbows.
Elbow-like adjResembling an elbow.
Elbow room nRoom or space in which to maneuver. 2. freedom or leeway.
Elbow-shaker nA gambler; knight of the elbow. 2. to live by one's wits.
Elchur adv.Elsewhere, otherwise, besides.
Eld nOne's old age, age in years, period of life, epoch. 2. old age, senility, an old person. 3. (poetic) time, an age, epoch, era, a long period of time. 4. in former ages, antiquity, olden times.
Eld vbTo age, become old, grow old; make old age, to elden. 2. to delay linger
Elded adj.Inveterate
Elden vbTo age, grow older.
Elder nWidely distributed deciduous shrub which has masses of white clustered flowers and yields berries used for making elderberry or elder wine.
Elderberry nA shrub or tree of the genus 'Sambuca.' 2. a small, edible, purplish-back fruit of the plant used in cooking and to flavor drinks etc. 3. fruit of the elder: a drupe.
Eldercare nThe care of the Elderly.
Elderdom nAuthority; dominion.  2. re-eminence; superiority. 3. the authority, rule, or office of an elder. 4. the state of being an elder, or of being older; elder-hood; elderhood.  5. the role or influence of an elder or elders
Elderhood nThe state or quality or condition of bein an elder.
Elderish adjSomewhat or rather old; elderly.
Elderliness nThe quality or state of being elderly.
Elderly advOld; having lived for relatively many years. 2. of an object, being old-fashioned or frail due to aging.
Eldern adjOf or belonging to earlier times.
Eldership nSeniority, the state or condition of being older. 2. the position or office of being elder.
Elderwed nA elderly married person; especially one who marries late in life.
Elderwort nDanewort.
Eldfather n.Patriarch, paternal ancestor, forebear, grandfather.
Elding n[OE aeld: fire} - fuel of twigs or furze.
Eldmen n.Seniors, elders
Eldmother nMaternal grandmother, forebear, ancestor, matriarch,
Eldness n.Oldness, old age, antiquity, a former state of things.
Eldnying adj.Jealous, suspicious, envious; also note variant: Eyndill
Eldred nMature counsel (eld & rede).
Eldring n.Elders, parents, ancestors
Eldritch nAn Old English derived word used to describe that which is otherworldly, often by being weird, ghostly, or uncanny. The Dictionary of the Older Scottish Tongue also associates the word with elven things, but that connection has been shown to be a misuse or appropriation. The word was often used in Scottish poetry and literature from the 1600s.[ In the 1900s, the word became more widely used in English after gaining popularity in books by H. P. Lovecraft and C. S. Lewis.
Eldritchly advIn a eldritch manner or way.
Eldship n.Old age
Eldtimes nOld times, oldness, antiquit, a former time.
Ele n.Oil
Elelandish adjOf another land; foreign.
Elenge adjVery long, tedious. 2. remote, lonely, dreary, miserable. 3. strange, foreign.
Elengely adjSolitary, cheerless, miserable.
Elengely advDrearily, miserably.
Ellengeness nEllingness, loneliness, dreariness, misery.
Elesaw nJuice; sometimes also oil.
Elet nFuel, eld.
Eleven nOne more than ten: a cardinal numeral beginning the second decade: as, eleven men. 2. the number which is the sum of ten and one. 3. a symbol representing eleven units, as 11, or XI., or X1.
Eleven phr"Give Us Back Our Eleven Days" - when England adopted the Gregorian calendar in 1751 in place of the Julian Calendar, eleven days were dropped, 2 September 1752 being followed by 14 September 1752. Many people thought that they were being cheated out of eleven days' pay. Hence the popular cry from the masses, "Give us back Our eleven day!s"
Eleventh nOne of the eleven equal parts of a whole.
Eleventh adjThe ordinal number corresponding to eleven; the next number after ten.
Eleventhly advIn the eleventh place. 2. eleventh in a row.
Elf nOriginally a dwarfish being of Teutonic mythology, possessed of magical powers which it uses for good or ill of mankind. Later the name was for an imp and then for fairies. The word is O.E. aelf, Icelandic alfr and Teutonic alp (a nightmare).
Elf phr"Play the Elf" - to act maliciously.
Elfdom nThe world, realm or domain of elves.
Elfen adjThe female elf; a fairy, nymph. 2. belonging to, or relating to eves. 3. derived terms, including: dunelfen; sealfen; waterelfen; wodelfen.
Elf-fire nThe plant 'Will-of-the-Wisp' : Ignis fatuus; also called walking fire; and in the US ghost-light; spook light.
Elf-folk nElves collectively.
Elf-god nCupid.
Elfinhood nThe state of being an elf.
Elf-kingdom nThe kingdom of the elves and ruled by an elf.
Elfin saddle nPlants including the Helvetia crispa, Gyra mitra.
Elfinwood nKrummholz, dense low matted bushes at the tree line.
Elfish adjResembling of characteristic of elves in some aspect.
Elfishly advIn a elfish manner.
Elfishness nThe state or quality of being an elf.
Elfkin nA little elf.
Elfland nThe land of the Elves
Elflike adjResembling an elf.
Elflock nTangled hair
Elf-marked adjThose born with a natural defect, according to an ancient scottish tradition, are marked by elves for mischief.
Elfship nThe office of an elf.
Elfwort nElf dock, scabwort, inula helenium.
Eling n.Unction, as in 'the last eling' (extreme unction)
Elk nThe largest member of the deer family; a moose.
Elk hound nAny breed of dog in Scandinavia that hunt moose.
Elkskin nThe skin of the elk, or leather made from it.
Elkwood nThe soft, spongy wood of the Magnolia umbrella.
Ell nAn old measure of length, which like a foot , was taken from a part of the body, that is, the forearm was originally 18 inches. The measurement varied from time to time and the English ell of 45 ins seems to have been borrowed by the French during the C16th for measuring cloth. The Scottish ell was about 37 ins; the Flemish ell about 27 ins and the french about 47 ins.
Ell phr"Give him an Inch and He'll Take an Ell" - give him a little freedom and he will take great liberties or make greater demands.
Ellen nIn OE: zeal, strength, power, vigour, value, courage, fortitude, strife, contention.
Ellenless n.Powerless
Ell-broad adjBroad as an ell.
Ell-length adjLength of 18 ins or 457 mm.
Ell-ridge nAn old land measure.
Ellwand n"King's Ell-wand" or Orions Belt. 2. a measuring rod, an ell measure. 3. the longer of the bones in the forearm
Ell-wide adjAs wide as an ell.
Elm nElm tree of the genus Ulmus.
Elmen adjOf or pertaining to the elm tree. 2. composed of elm trees
Elmy adjConsisting of, characterized, or abounding in elms.
Elne n.Courage, strength, ellen. 2. comfort, grace in theological matters, elning
Elne vbTo strengthen, hearten, comfort.
Elning nComfort, grace.
Els sfx.For example: Buriels (not plural); raedels: riddle; rekels: incense.
Else prnOther; otherwise, if not.
Else phr"Or Else" - you will regret something.
Elsehow advIn some, or any, other way.
Elseness nThe quality of being something else.
Elsewards advIn the direction of. 2. towards some other place.
Elsewhat prnSomething or anything else.
Elsewhen advAt another time; at other times.
Elsewhence advFrom some other place or quarter.
Elsewhere advAt some other point. 2. in some other place.
Elsewhither advTo some other place; in some other direction; whithersoever.
Elsewho prnAny one else.
Elsewise advIn some other manner. 2. in other circumstances; otherwise.
Elvat nAn oil vessel; see ampulla.
Elven nA female elf.
Elver nA young eel of fresh or brackish water; (from 'eel' & 'fare')

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