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Anglish wordbook
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The Anglish Wordbook is for gathering together all known and forthput Anglish/New-English wordstock and their meanings. Everyone is free to put in words which they have brought up by themselves or any word they have seen brooked in Anglish/New-English by others, that are either newbuilt words or ones already in the wordbook. The goal is to make a full backbearing of words from all kinds of Anglish/New-English, and to give right reckonings as to their meaning and birth.

Brooking the wordbookEdit

All inputs in the wordbook take the following shape, forelaid on the right wordbook layout:

wortcraft n the growing of plants and flowers, the craft and lore about growing plants; horticulture
[compound of wort 'plant, herb' + -CRAFT]

First comes the word itself, in bold rune, followed by the deal of speech, handwritten (italic). The wordbook brooks mean offshortenings from wordbooks for these, such as n for nameword, vb for deedwords, adj for markwords, and so forth. The main body of the input is a bewriting of what the word means and also, if needed, how it is brooked. The last bit, in four-sided hooks, is the wordlore, giving some knowledge of its birth. If the word is already in the wordbook, it will have the offshortening OED or CED (Oxford or Cambridge).

Inputting to the wordbookEdit

If you feel like the wordbook is missing a word or a meaning, kindly feel free to put it in, for the wordbook will only grow with forthwarded bestowings from all Anglish/New-English brookers. The only law is that the word must be in some way onelike to Anglish/New-English, that is, not found in Ancwe (Ancillary World English). This can be anything from wholly new words made up outfoldly for Anglish/New English to seldseen, byledish words. A good way to mete this is to fathom brooking it in talk and thinking about what the backdeed of the other wight would be.

To make a standhard input, like the one above, you need to brook an outlay, which is mainly a forewritten shard of ash (code, they're kinwords) which shapes and lays out your input right. It may look overwhelming at first, but if you follow the short reckoning below, it is not too hard.

The ash brooked looks like this (you can cut and stick this to brook):

{{wordbook entry
|word=
|part of speech=
|meaning=
|synonyms=
|etymology=
}}

As you can see, there are rooms left after the samenesstokens for keying the input. Hopefully, the knowledge needed in each one is selfreckoning; the only thing is that the meaning and likewords are sundered, as both are called for to shun the wordbook onefold becoming a likewordlist, which is not of as much brookness in the long run. The meaning and wordlore can be given in any way you find fitting, whether that be a sore starchy wordbookway or something more offhand.

Here is the true input brooked for the byspel near the top of the leaf:

{{wordbook entry
|word=wortcraft
|part of speech=n
|meaning=the growing of plants and flowers, the craft and lore about growing plants 
|synonyms=horticulture
|etymology=compound of ''wort'' 'plant, herb' + -CRAFT
}}

When there is already an input for the same word, but with an offset outlay, kindly put the time in below it, and mark them (1) and (2).

Shifting or taking something outEdit

In broadness, once something has been put in, it should only be shifted or taken out as moot on the talkleaf. The wordbook is meant not only as a marking of Anglish/New-English, but also a 'chepstowstead' of beliefs, where folk can put forthward words for others to think about. Words should belive unless they have been thrown out by the fellowship of brookers and are no longer thought likely forthputs.

The only outtakes are words which are either Ancwe (Ancillary World English), or are themselves not Anglish/New-English, which can be taken out without moot (though bemarking on the bework is still needed).

Old English runestaffEdit

The English tongue was first written in the Old English Futhorc runestaff, in brookness from the 5th hundredyear. So few byspels of this writing have thrived, these being mostly short inwritings or shards. The Old English Futhorc was newsteaded by the Southlandish runestaff from about the 7th hundredyear forthward, although the two went on together for some time. Futhorc flowed into the Southlandish runestaff by giving it the runes thorn (Þ, þ) and wynn (Ƿ, ƿ). The rune eth (Ð, ð) was later thought up as a wending of d, and at last yogh (Ȝ, ȝ) was made by Norman writers from the islandish g in Old English and Irish, and brooked alongside their Carolingish g.

The binding Æ (æ), for ae, was taken on as a rune in its own rightness, named ash after a Futhorc rune. In sore early Old English Œ (œ), for oe, also showed up as an outmade rune named ethel, again after an Old English rune. Further, the binding w (double-u), for vv, was in brookness. The reard of [Œ,œ] was a mark of Old English which made it out from West Saxish in which the samewise reard was [E,e], f.b., wœ in OE = we in WS; grœne in OE = grene in WS.

In the year 1011, a writer named Brightferth (Old English:Byrhtferð) set the Old English runestaff up for rimloregoals.[2] He listed the 24 runes of the Southlandish runestaff (begetting andtoken) first, then 5 bycoming English runes, starting with the Tironish ⁊, an islandish andtoken:

A B C D E F G H I K L M N O P Q R S T V X Y Z & ⁊ Ƿ Þ Ð Æ

LISTING LISTING LISTING LISTING LISTING

Spreadsheet for Bound Deedwords

TAKE + UP = ABSORB, ADOPT

TAKE + IN = ABSORB

TAKE + OFF = REMOVE

TAKE OUT = EXTRACT

BREAK + UP = DISINTEGRATE

BREAK + DOWN = COLLAPSE

BLOW + UP = EXPLODE, DETONATE

DRIVE + OUT = EXPEL

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