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Anglish wordbook

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Anglish wordbook
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The Anglish Wordbook is for gathering together all known and forthput Anglish/New-English wordstock and their meanings. Everyone is free to put in words which they have brought up by themselves or any word they have seen brooked in Anglish/New-English by others, that are either newbuilt words or ones already in the wordbook. The goal is to make a full backbearing of words from all kinds of Anglish/New-English, and to give right reckonings as to their meaning and birth.

Brooking the wordbookEdit

All entries in the wordbook take the following shape, near modelled on the normal wordbook layout:

wortcraft n the growing of plants and flowers, the craft and lore about growing plants; horticulture
[compound of wort 'plant, herb' + -CRAFT]

First comes the word itself, in bold rune, followed by the part of speech in italics. The wordbook brooks normal dictionary offshortenings for these, such as n for noun, vb for verb, adj for adjective, and so forth. The main body of the entry is a description of what the word means, and also, if needed, how it is brooked. The last part, in square brackets, is the etymology of the word, giving some knowledge of its births. If the word already exists in the dictionary, it will have the offshortening OED or CED (Oxford or Cambridge).

Inputting to the wordbookEdit

If thou feelest the wordbook is missing a word, or a meaning, please feel free to input it, for the wordbook will only grow with forthwarded bestowals from all Anglish/New-English brookers. The only rule is that the word must be in some way onelike to Anglish/New-English, that is, not found in Ancwe (Ancillary World English). This can be anything from whole new words made up specifical for Anglish/New English, to rare, dialectual, or simply uncommon words. A good way to mete this is to fathom brooking it in talk, and what the backdeed of the other person would be.

In order to make a standhard entry, like the one above, thou needest to brook a template, which is mainly a forewritten shard of code which shapens and lays out thine entry right. It may look daunting at first, but if thou followest the short reckoning below, it is not too hard.

The code brooked looks like this (thou can cut and paste this to brook):

{{wordbook entry
|word=
|part of speech=
|meaning=
|synonyms=
|etymology=
}}

As thou canst see, there are rooms left after the equals tokens for typing the entry. Hopeful, the knowledge needed in each one is selfreckoning, the only point is that the meaning and synonyms are sundered. This is because both are called for in order to avoid the wordbook simply becoming a list of synonyms, which is not of as much brookness in the long run. The meaning and etymology can be given in any style which thou findest fitting, whether that be a very formal dictionary style, or something more informal.

Here is the actual entry brooked for the example near to the top of the page:

{{wordbook entry
|word=wortcraft
|part of speech=n
|meaning=the growing of plants and flowers, the craft and lore about growing plants 
|synonyms=horticulture
|etymology=compound of ''wort'' 'plant, herb' + -CRAFT
}}

When there is already an entry for the same word, but with an offset definition, please input thine entry below it, and mark them (1) and (2) respective.

Shifting or outtaking an entryEdit

In broadness, once an entry has been made, it should only be shifted or taken out as moot on the talkleaf. The wordbook is meant not only as a marking of Anglish/New-English, but also a 'marketstead' of beliefs, where folk can put forthward words for others to think about. Words should stay unless they have been outcast by the community of brookers and are no longer thought viable suggestions.

The only exceptions are words which are either Ancwe (Ancillary World English), or are themselves not Anglish/New-English, which can be outtaken without moot (though comment on the edit is still needed).

Old English runestaffEdit

The English tongue was first written in the Old English Futhorc runic runestaff, in brookness from the 5th hundredyear. Very few examples of this writing have thrived, these being mostly short inscriptions or shards. The Old English Futhorc was newsteaded by the Latin runestaff from about the 7th hundredyear forthward, although the two continued in parallel for some time. Futhorc inflowed the Latin runestaff by providing it with the runes thorn (Þ, þ) and wynn (Ƿ, ƿ). The rune eth (Ð, ð) was later devised as a modification of d, and at last yogh (Ȝ, ȝ) was made by Norman scribes from the insular g in Old English and Irish, and brooked alongside their Carolingian g.

The ligature Æ (æ), for ae, was adopted as a rune in its own rightness, named æsc ("ash") after a Futhorc rune. In very early Old English Œ (œ), for oe, also appeared as a distinct rune named œðel ("ethel"), again after an Old English rune. Further, the ligature w (double-u), for vv, was in brookness. The sound of [Œ,œ] was a feature of Old English (Anglian) which distinguished it from West Saxish in which the equivalent sound was [E,e], e.g., wœ in OE = we in WS; grœne in OE = grene in WS.

In the year 1011, a writer named Byrhtferð alined the Old English runestaff for numerological goals.[2] He listed the 24 runes of the Latin runestaff (begetting ampersand) first, then 5 additional English runes, starting with the Tironian nota ond, ⁊, an insular symbol for and:

A B C D E F G H I K L M N O P Q R S T V X Y Z & ⁊ Ƿ Þ Ð Æ

TABLE TABLE TABLE TABLE TABLE

Phrasal verb matrix:

TAKE + UP = ABSORB, ADOPT

TAKE + IN = ABSORB

TAKE + OFF = REMOVE

TAKE OUT = EXTRACT

BREAK + UP = DISINTEGRATE

BREAK + DOWN = COLLAPSE

BLOW + UP = EXPLODE, DETONATE

DRIVE + OUT = EXPEL

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